The 2011 Intervention in Libya: Consequences of Enacting the ‘R2P’

Demonstrators with the Kingdom of Libya flag in Benghazi on February 28, 2011 (Picture: Tiago Petinga/EPA)
Demonstrators with the Kingdom of Libya flag in Benghazi on February 28, 2011 (Picture: Tiago Petinga/EPA)

Author: Louisa H. Poulsen - Edited by: Michael R. Zieniewicz and Giacomo Toffanello

The international intervention in Libya in 2011 was initially proclaimed to be a success and a model for future Western interventions, specifically because long-term dictator Muammar Gaddafi was overthrown. However, now four years later, the situation in Libya is far from stable with various armed groupings challenging the authority of the central government. Often considered in relation to the on-going civil war in Syria, scrutinising the Libyan case is as relevant as ever. In this article, Louisa H. Poulsen, a Master’s student in International Security and Law, will revisit the legal and political aspects of the 2011 intervention, and will discuss to what extent the intervention might set a precedent for future similar actions.

Continue reading “The 2011 Intervention in Libya: Consequences of Enacting the ‘R2P’”